Death toll from Brazilian mudslide hits 767

Brazil mudslide deaths hit 767

 

Jan 22 (KATAKAMI / RIA NOVOSTI) — The death toll from the severe storms and mudslides in the southeastern Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro has reached 767, local authorities said.

About 400 residents are still unaccounted for – some believed to be buried.

Rescuers have been struggling to reach some isolated areas since the country’s worst natural disaster in decades hit the state on January 11. According to official figures, the disaster has affected some 70,000 people, and 20,000 of them had to leave their homes.

Despite the poor state of the roads in the region, most areas can now be reached by vehicles.

The cities of Nova Friburgo and Teresopolis are hardest hit by the disaster.

President Dilma Rousseff on Friday released $239 million to Nova Friburgo.

The total aid released by the federal government to the damaged state of Rio de Janeiro reached $658 million. (*)

 

RIO DE JANEIRO, January 22

 

Photostream : Dilma Rousseff Sworn-In as Brazil's First Woman President

Newly sworn-in Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (L) waves as she parades atop of a Rolls Royce vehicle beside her daughter Paula after receiving the presidential sash at Planalto Palace in Brasilia, on January 1, 2011. Rousseff, who beat opposition candidate Jose Serra in a run-off election last October with 56% of the votes, has become the South American nation's first female president. (Photo by MAURICIO LIMA/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff and her Vice President Michel Temer walk up the ramp to Planalto Palace after bidding farewell to outgoing President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in Brasilia, January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Newly sworn-in Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (L) receives the presidential sash from outgoing President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, 1 Jan 2011. As reported by the Voice of America, Dilma Rousseff took the oath of office Saturday during a ceremony in the capital of Brasilia, taking over from her highly popular political mentor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, known to many as "Lula." Ms. Rousseff served as his chief of staff for five years and, in her first speech to Congress, she promised to continue many of the former president's economic and social welfare programs. Under Mr. da Silva, Brazil emerged as one of the world's major economies, along with Russia, India and China. It is estimated that 30 million people joined the middle class during his eight-year presidency.

Brazilian President-elect Dilma Rousseff (2-L), her vice president Michel Temer (L), outgoing President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva (2-R) and his wife Marisa Leticia (R) walks to the stage to transfer the presidential band at Planalto Palace during the inauguration ceremony in Brasilia, on January 1, 2011. (Photo byMAURICIO LIMA/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (L) greets Colombia's President Juan Manual Santos as her Vice President Michel Temer stands with them, during a reception at Planalto Palace in Brasilia January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff poses with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a reception after she was sworn in to office, in Planalto Palace in Brasilia January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff speaks with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas during a reception after she was sworn into office, at Planalto Palace in Brasilia January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff talks with Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez during a reception after she was sworn in to office, in Planalto Palace in Brasilia January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Portugal's Prime Minister Jose Socrates (L) speaks with Spain's Prince Felipe (2nd L), Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez (R) and El Salvador's President Mauricio Funes during a reception for Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Planalto Palace in Brasilia January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff (3rd L, facing camera) embraces former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva as Vice President Michel Temer (2nd R, facing camera) embraces Lula's wife Marisa Leticia, as Lula da Silva leaves Planalto Palace, in Brasilia January 1, 2011. Rousseff is the first woman to become Brazil's president, taking the reins of an emerging giant with a booming economy, vast new oil reserves and growing international diplomatic clout. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos

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